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Phanny’s short-term goals and long-term success!

Phanny’s short-term goals and long-term success!

We would love to share a wonderful story with you about Phanny, who recently completed our financial literacy workshop, ‘Riel Change’. Phanny is a mother of two children, wife and small business owner. Phanny runs a small vegetable stall at her local market, selling vegetables she buys from a local farmer. Before attending our workshop, Phanny was unaware how much money she was earning – or losing  – in her business, and how much she spent on her family and business expenses, as she combined her personal and business finances. Phanny’s vision board of her short-term goals to achieve during and shortly after the workshop firmly stated the following: 1)     To save money to buy a bicycle for my son 2)     To negotiate with my husband about his alcohol use 3)     To grow my own vegetables to sell at my market stall We are thrilled to report that Phanny is now managing her daily income and expenses and running a personal and business budget. Phanny said to us, “learning about saving, budgeting and how to track my income is really important for me as a small market seller.” Phanny learnt how to increase the value of her product and is now growing her own vegetables to sell at her stall, which has increased her profit margins! After the workshop we visited Phanny at her home to follow up on the impact she sees attending Riel Change has had on her life and she excitedly announced to us, “I have achieved my goal because I have saved to buy a bicycle for my son, as I promised him.” Phanny is happy and proud as now her son can get to school...
I dream of becoming a midwife

I dream of becoming a midwife

My name is Kunthea Ny and I dream of becoming a midwife. It all started about one year ago when Green Gecko Project sponsored me to attend a humanitarianism and leadership symposium in Phnom Penh. It was there that I met my idol, Robin Lim – a midwife and the founder of Yayasan Bumi Sehat (Healthy Mother Earth Foundation) health clinics. Robin helps thousands of low-income women in Indonesia achieve healthy pregnancies and successful births. I was so inspired – I instantly knew I wanted to do the same thing for women in Cambodia. I want to open my own midwifery clinic and offer free services to the many women in my country that are afraid to see a doctor or that don’t have access to a hospital. Or the free hospital is too full and they have to sell their land in order to afford to pay for a private hospital. I began watching YouTube clips about midwifery. Then, unexpectedly, my Green Gecko Project sister went into labor. There was no one about and there wasn’t enough time to get her to the hospital. I wasn’t ready to deliver a baby yet, but I had no choice. Her water broke. My sister was on the ground and pushed. I had never touched a newborn baby before. At first, it was yucky as he came out and then when he started crying, I felt pity. I didn’t want him to feel sad. But then, I felt nothing but love for him and for my sister, who had a big smile on her face. I wasn’t confident to cut the...
The challenges women face in Cambodia

The challenges women face in Cambodia

Women in Cambodia are mostly vulnerable. They have so many challenges in their lives such as a lack of opportunity to access education and be involved in social development. Yet, they also have a lot of responsibilities. Here are just some of the challenges and responsibilities she faces: Cambodian traditions Cambodian tradition says that women are responsible for looking after the house, for cooking and for bringing up the children. Many families follow this tradition, so why bother study for the future when women just become a housewife to cook for her husband and look after her baby. In other words, the lessons from school will become useless. This is also why most families train their daughter to do housework such as cooking, cleaning, etc. and don’t send their daughters to school. This is still a big challenge for many girls in Cambodia. Access to help It is challenging for women to share their stories and concerns to someone who they trust, allowing her some relief from her stress and to find better solutions. Cambodian tradition doesn’t allow women to have a voice for herself or in society. Credit for her work Most people still have a strong belief that women are not as clever as men, but I think this is because she is not given the opportunity prove them wrong. Today, many women have a job outside of home but still her husband expects her to go for meal shopping, cooking, cleaning and childcare, etc. Domestic violence Domestic Violence is still a big issue in Cambodia. My experiences working with clients have shown me that there are not many...
Why I work at WRC

Why I work at WRC

My name is Riny Chea and I am 26 years old. I come from Kampong Thom province. I have a big family made up of two older sisters and myself. I have a Bachelor of Law from 2014 from Build Bright University (BBU) in Siem Reap. I attended a Women’s Resource Center (WRC) parenting workshop and learned about parenting and parents as good role models for children. I attended the workshop because WRC was committed to enrolling trainees and my previous organization was a partner. I took the chance to attend. The participants included 1 father, 4 mothers and 2 non-mothers (including me). I realized the workshop was very useful for me, even though I am not yet a mother. I feel happy to have learned how to be a positive mother, how to educate my children and how to enjoy having a family. I was particularly interested in the four paths to having a great family: The establishment of family fun time Educating children without violence Understanding the role a parent Knowing about anger management Parents should not only provide their children with their physical needs, but also with emotional support. When I returned to my community, I spread what I learned to all parents living there. They did not understand properly about the role of the parents and I was happy to help them bring happiness to their children. I saw the lack of education and their struggles with illiteracy. These are enormous concerns for the elimination of violence. I told them that WRC provides workshops containing pictures, videos, etc. which reflect the consequences of enacting violence...
First Step social work training

First Step social work training

Social worker, Senara Tan, went to Phnom Penh to train with First Step. Here’s what she learnt while there. I am currently travelling on the Mekong Express from Phnom Penh to Siem Reap for $10. Over the other buses, you get breakfast, a bottle of cold water, wifi and a significant amount of legroom. The bus, however, is old and tatty. They have done it up with some dangling fabric but the bus is at least 40 years old. Anyway, I’ve just finished one week training with First Step. They directly meet the needs of male survivors of sexual abuse and their supporters. This includes the direct provision of a variety of social work and support services for boys and their families, and a range of high quality, unique training, learning and support services for those working with and caring for boys and young men. What I most enjoyed was listening to the presenters who have created a range of unique learning, training and support opportunities designed to meet the needs of social workers, carers and others working with victims and survivors. Here are the top 3 things I learned: Knowing ourselves – empathy-building is good for relationships with your clients Different kinds of responses to use in counselling like body language, sounds, short words, clarifying questions and reflecting feeling The stages of a child’s sexual development. Knowing the clients’ sex, sexual relationships and sexual developments helps to better understand the clients’ experience with sexual abuse and/or exploitation. I will use the training back at Women’s Resource Center to better understand clients who have experienced sexual abuse and/or exploitation....